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Catchword named top naming agency in the world 2017

Catchword named top naming agency in the world 2017On Friday, Clutch—the leading provider of unbiased ratings and reviews for marketing agencies—announced its Global Leaders in Naming, and Catchword ranks as the #1 naming agency worldwide!

“It’s no easy feat standing out from the rest when it comes to the naming industry,” said Clutch Business Analyst Jenna Seter. “On Clutch, where the naming competition is especially fierce, it’s even harder to be distinguished as one of the best companies that provide naming services.”

With 20 reviews from clients such as Corning, Plantronics, and BlackBerry, Catchword averaged a perfect 5 stars across the four categories of Quality, Schedule, Cost, and Willingness to Refer— landing us in the top spot in a field of 159 naming-service providers.

Clutch evaluates each agency through in-depth phone interviews with vetted clients, along with an analysis of overall experience and market presence. The client and project details in these reviews are often more helpful for potential clients than simple testimonials or star ratings. We are deeply grateful to the clients who took the time to provide Clutch their thoughts about their Catchword experience.

“Clutch is very proud of all of the agencies [that have] earned their spot as leaders on our platform,” Seter continued. “At the #1 spot for naming agencies on Clutch, Catchword is certainly no exception.”

As Catchword approaches its 20th anniversary in 2018, we are simply delighted to be recognized in this way. Our co-founder Maria Cypher said it best: “We love what we do, and we’re constantly striving to create the best names and the most satisfying client experiences. And well, to be validated for it feels pretty darn good.”

Heartfelt thanks to all our clients and partners for being an integral part of our success and for sharing in our excitement!

On Friday, Clutch—the leading provider of unbiased ratings and reviews for marketing agencies—announced its Global Leaders in Naming, and Catchword ranks as the #1 naming agency worldwide!

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In honor of World Nursery Rhyme Week (a UK event celebrating the importance of nursery rhymes for early learning), we spotlight these company and product names that were inspired by our favorite characters from childhood.

Simple Simon’s Pizza, an Oklahoma franchiseSimple Simon's Pizza

 

 

Humpty Dumpty Snack Foods, chips and more from Maine since 1947Humpty Dumpty snack foods

 

Old Mother Hubbard Baking Company, out of Gloucester, Mass, purveyor of fine pet treats for 80 years

 

 

 

 

And our favorite, because who doesn’t like a little payback?

Miss Muffet’s Revenge, spider killer

In honor of World Nursery Rhyme Week (a UK event celebrating the importance of nursery rhymes for early learning), we spotlight these company and product names that were inspired by our favorite characters from childhood.

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Rabobank sign

Great names can themselves inspire action. “Nest” makes you want to get cozy at home. “The North Face” makes you want to climb something. So where does that leave “Rabobank”?

Financial company Rabobank is a big deal in the Netherlands, where there’s no implied crime in combining Raiffeisen-Boerenleenbank. It has since expanded to the U.S. and grown in California, even purchasing the naming rights to Rabobank Arena in Bakersfield.
So is the name “Rabobank” a naming felony? Or is it just fun to say?

Great names can themselves inspire action. “Nest” makes you want to get cozy at home. “The North Face” makes you want to climb something. So where does that leave “Rabobank”?

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Tapestry logo

Tapestry logo

Fashion powerhouse Coach surprised the world by announcing that its parent company — which recently acquired Kate Spade and Stuart Weitzman — will be changing its name to Tapestry.

Nary a name change escapes lampooning on Twitter, and after the requisite ridicule, Chief Executive Victor Luis quickly clarified that the Coach brand will not be changing; the company is merely creating a new corporate identity for its collection of brands.

In this case, I think Coach made absolutely the right decision.

from www.coach.com

Tapestry has a spot-on message — bringing us to fabric, fashion, and a kind of a collection or assortment, which speaks directly to its nature as a parent company of many brands (much like Google’s parent, Alphabet). Tapestry is soft and supple, yet balanced by the weight it carries from the T in Tap and the fact that it is three syllables long.

And perhaps thanks to Carole King and a healthy metaphorical use of the word in our lexicon, Tapestry feels classical, not outdated — it evokes a historical authenticity, like the Coach brand itself.

The company expresses its rationale for the change this way: “The name Tapestry reflects our core values of optimism, inclusivity, and innovation and speaks to creativity, craftsmanship, and authenticity on a shared platform” (from its FAQ for investors). I don’t particularly get optimism, or innovation (weaving is an ancient art form), but the other traits come across well.

The name and choice to create it also succeed from a naming architecture standpoint. Firstly, I think there is great value in keeping the Coach product brand on the same plane as the new acquisitions. Coach is known for bags. The creation of a separate parent entity allows the Coach brand to remain clearly associated with what it does best. Equally so, it allows the other brands to better keep their autonomy — which is important when your magic derives from what is portrayed as a single entity or even single designer’s vision. (Just ask fans of Pixar after Disney bought it.)

Secondly, when acquiring brands or spinning out many complementary products — as Tapestry’s strategy seems to be — it can get confusing if you don’t establish a clear system. The name Tapestry allows them to move forward with a, well, tapestry of acquisitions and new brands without confusion or conflict. Heck, they can now even acquire other brands that primarily do bags, which would have been weird had the umbrella company remained Coach.

Fashion powerhouse Coach surprised the world by announcing that its parent company — which recently acquired Kate Spade and Stuart Weitzman — will be changing its name to Tapestry. … In this case, I think Coach made absolutely the right decision.

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Jet, the aspiring giant online retailer trying to swipe a slice of Amazon’s (organic) Whole Foods pie has just launched a slightly upscale house brand for food and other household essentials. They’re calling it Uniquely J.

Jet.com spokeswoman Meredith Klein told the New York Post, “Uniquely J is yet another way Jet.com is innovating for the metro millennial. From the boldly designed packaging, to the fun, witty label copy and quality ingredients – everything was designed with this metro consumer in mind.”

Color me unimpressed.

From TechCrunch.com

If you can ignore the (perky smiley incongruous) Jet sticker, the packaging for many of the products is edgy and arresting. It’s not your average snacks and sundries packaging, and situates them squarely in the Trader Joe’s arena in terms of branding.

But the name? When I first read Uniquely J, I assumed it was a house-brand clothing line. Or a Uniqlo and J.Crew merger. I went to clothing because to me, foodstuffs isn’t an area where overt “uniqueness” makes sense. I’m into clothes that make me feel special. Not as true for tissues and corn flakes.

Do I think that a brand that evokes uniqueness is right for the audience? Sure. But telegraphing its uniqueness is not the right move and undermines the mission. Why? Their target audience cares deeply, deeply about discovering their passions rather than being told. All advice about marketing to millennials deals with this (Want a good intro to how to gently help millennials discover a brand? Read the story behind PBR’s massive resurgence.) It is impossible to discover how cool and unique a brand is if they are calling themselves just that. In fact it feels like pandering.

That’s not to mention the Naming 101 reasons Uniquely J doesn’t shine.

For one, it’s unwieldy — a borderline tongue twister (Uniquely J Uniquely J Uniquely J). And for two, it harkens to the stock –ly names of the past, the mere allusion to which should be avoided at all cost.

And I will end with this: though the adverb + noun construction was perhaps once raffish and fun, now it feels really 90s, a la “Suddenly Susan.” (I thought that trend ended with “That’s So Raven.”) The fact is, branding strategies are different now than they were even 20 years ago, driven by changing tastes, increased marketing saturation, and a search for domain names, among other things. This name doesn’t feel quite with the times.

A tourist town boutique could easily get away with a name that felt a few decades late. I could see Uniquely J as Jay-Z’s (ironic) response to Snoop Dog and Martha Stewart’s cooking collaboration. But it doesn’t work well for chasing the elusive metro millennial.

When I first read Uniquely J, I assumed it was a house-brand clothing line. Or a Uniqlo and J.Crew merger. I went to clothing because to me, foodstuffs isn’t an area where overt “uniqueness” makes sense.

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