CatchThis Blog / domain name

Alex Kelley

February 17, 2016

This is just a friendly reminder that just because something is newly available for purchase, or heralded as the next big thing, or advertised as eminently necessary, doesn’t mean you should buy it. This includes Snuggies, combination PB and J jars, and the .cloud extension. A big part of naming in the 21st century concerns […]

Mark Skoultchi

August 10, 2015

This post originally appeared on MarketingProfs on 8/5/15 One of the hardest financial decisions you’ll face when naming or renaming a company or product is whether you should splurge for the exact .com domain name—and, if not, how you should adapt the URL so that it fits with your brand and allows consumers to easily […]

Laurel Sutton

December 2, 2013

Hop on over to Domain Name Advice to read the blog I wrote about business names and domains. It’s a quick how-to guide that will tell you what you need to know about creating, checking, and registering domain names for your business. Here’s an excerpt: Back in the old days of naming, before the Internet […]

Catchword

August 10, 2010

When do you need an exact .com—and when can you get away without one? How do you go about finding a domain name? Or negotiating a purchase from another party? In this 6-minute video, Catchword principal and linguistics director Laurel Sutton answers these questions and others you probably haven’t thought of yet. She also shares […]

Laurel Sutton

March 6, 2008

Network Solutions has been served with a class action suit. The suit claims that the NSI has forced customers into buying domains from the company rather than through potentially cheaper avenues, in effect netting the company millions of dollars. This makes me happy, since I’ve always viewed NSI/Verisign as a government-sponsored monopoly that gets away […]

Laurel Sutton

September 7, 2007

No, not really, but Wired is using this pic for their story and I liked it. A Nevada man pleaded guilty Thursday to his plotting to steal domain names URLs from their legitimate owners by impersonating a California intellectual property lawyer and send threatening letters to domain name owners in hopes of convincing them to […]