Trademark Screening

Preliminary Availability Screening | We put the do in due diligence.

Although strategic alignment and creative vitality are key to name development, at the end of the day, names must be available for use. Catchword’s expert preliminary search process ensures the greatest chance of success when name candidates undergo full trademark search. After all, there’s only one thing worse than finding out that the name you just fell in love with means “Your sister is a bag of hammers” in Samoan. And that’s finding out that it doesn’t—but you can’t legally own it.

Before recommending names, our search team screens them in the appropriate combination of USPTO, Google, and country and industry-specific databases—determined in discussion with your corporate counsel. (If you don’t have a good trademark attorney, we’re happy to recommend one.) If domain availability is required, we’ll also screen for .com availability and provide an opinion on purchasability.

Our extensive research allows us to present names that are much more likely to clear your counsel’s full trademark search. It also weeds out names that, while not legally infringing, raise marketing concerns because they might recall a competitor’s name (or a porn site, or a startup that went down in flames). Think of our trademark team as your attorney’s new BFF.

How to Trademark a Company or Product Name.

Blog

Caavo

from www.caavo.com

Caavo is a device that unifies all the doodads plugged into your TV. It’s a home entertainment bundler, connecting your TV, DVR, videogames, streaming channels, laptop, yada yada yada.

I’m flipping through channels, trying to find a reason they named it Caavo, and the reception is pretty fuzzy.

At first I thought it could be a strange corruption of cavort. And then maybe a rearrangement of avoca from avocation or avocado.  In Latin, cavo comes from the root that means hollow, or to excavate. The latter is more plausible, but to me the product is much more concerned with ease and streamlining than discovery.

And then I was informed that in Italian, cavo means wire. That’s likely it. In essence, the Caavo channels all of your devices down the same wire.

Suffice it to say, they could have done better. Part of the allure of names derived from a romance language for English speakers is that they usually sound fancy. But in this case, the two As are unsightly and unwieldy, and do not suggest elegance.

Further, English doesn’t have a standard pronunciation for the rare double A; Aaron, aardvark, and naan all have slightly different vowel sounds. That means that English speakers won’t be confident in saying Caavo out loud.

And lastly, if indeed it does come from the Italian for “wire,” it certainly isn’t a root English speakers can recognize easily. Throwing an extra A into an Italian word that has no English crossover pretty much ensures that the origins of the word won’t be traced by English speakers.

It’s hard naming a startup. Naming can sometimes be the very last thing you want to focus on. And I know you want a cheap, exact .com domain name. And I know you want to sound cool. But please, take a little time and read our handy naming guide. There’s so, so much to be gained with a good name, I guarantee it is worth your while.

Grade: B-

English doesn’t have a standard pronunciation for the rare double A; Aaron, aardvark and naan all have slightly different vowel sounds. That means that English speakers won’t be confident in saying Caavo out loud.

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