Trademark Screening

Preliminary Availability Screening | We put the do in due diligence.

Although strategic alignment and creative vitality are key to name development, at the end of the day, names must be available for use. Catchword’s expert preliminary search process ensures the greatest chance of success when name candidates undergo full trademark search. After all, there’s only one thing worse than finding out that the name you just fell in love with means “Your sister is a bag of hammers” in Samoan. And that’s finding out that it doesn’t—but you can’t legally own it.

Before recommending names, our search team screens them in the appropriate combination of USPTO, Google, and country and industry-specific databases—determined in discussion with your corporate counsel. (If you don’t have a good trademark attorney, we’re happy to recommend one.) If domain availability is required, we’ll also screen for .com availability and provide an opinion on purchasability.

Our extensive research allows us to present names that are much more likely to clear your counsel’s full trademark search. It also weeds out names that, while not legally infringing, raise marketing concerns because they might recall a competitor’s name (or a porn site, or a startup that went down in flames). Think of our trademark team as your attorney’s new BFF.

How to Trademark a Company or Product Name.

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Catchword - top baby names 2016According to the Social Security Administration, the most popular baby names haven’t changed much from the past few years, with old-fashioned and biblical being common themes.

Emma is still the top baby name for girls. That’s the third year in a row. (And it’s placed in the top 5 since 2002.) Next come Olivia, Ava, Sophia, Isabella, and Mia. All very old-school European and feminine with that final “a.”

The next four of the top 10, Charlotte (inspired by the young English princess, no doubt), Abigail, and Emily are also old-fashioned and feminine. Harper at number 10 is the only modern or androgynous name.

For boys, Noah tops the list, where it has stood for the past four years. The dignified Liam and William [Irish and English versions of the same name] follow — they’ve ranked in the top 5 for the past five years plus. Like Charlotte, William‘s popularity may also have been influenced by the English royal family’s increased visibility since the wedding.

As with the girls, the majority of the top names for boys are old-fashioned, but unlike the Latin- and Greek-derived feminine names, the boys are largely biblical: Noah, James, Benjamin, Jacob, Michael, Elijah, and Ethan. Mason (number 4) is the only top 10 not found in the good book. Like Harper, it is a given name taken from an occupation-based surname.

See the full list, searchable by name, year, and change in popularity, at SSA.gov.

Emma & Noah still number 1. According to the Social Security Administration, the most popular baby names haven’t changed much from the past few years, with old-fashioned and biblical being common themes.

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